Countering violent extremism in schools

Published 2nd November, 2015 in Emergency Services, Family & Community Services, Police & Justice, Education, Education

To help schools counter violent extremism, students will have more counselling and support services while staff will be trained in identifying young people who might be vulnerable to supporting such extremism.

high school students in class
School students will have more counselling and support services while staff will have more training to assist NSW schools in countering violent extremism.

Counsellors and other school staff will receive training for when school starts next year to ensure they can identify vulnerable young people, and help them access support programs.

Up to five specialist school support teams will also work proactively with identified schools and respond to critical incidents, linking in with community leaders and ensuring schools have the support they need.

The expert teams will cost around $15 million and are part of a $47 million suite of measures developed by the NSW Government in response to the rise of violent extremism. The measures have been accelerated after the terrorist attack in Parramatta that cost the life of NSW Police Force worker Curtis Cheng.

NSW Premier Mike Baird said that we were locked in a global struggle with cynical manipulators who exploited vulnerable young people and children to commit acts of terror.

“Violent extremism is a willingness to use or support unlawful violence to promote a political, ideological or religious goal,” Premier Baird said.

“As we have seen, recently and tragically in our own community, it includes the willingness to use or support terrorism.”

Along with measures to support schools, the package includes a range of programs designed to build community cohesion and maintain cultural harmony.

Tougher controls for prison inmates

The measures come as the government also announced late last week that inmates considered a threat to national security will be subject to tighter controls inside prison, including additional restrictions on their mail, phone calls and visitors.

The tighter controls will help prevent inmates from coordinating terrorism activities or inciting extremism from inside prison.

 

Published 2nd November, 2015 in Emergency Services, Family & Community Services, Police & Justice, Education, Education