Revenge porn is a crime

Published 25th August, 2017 in Police & Justice

Perpetrators of intimate image abuse now face a maximum sentence of three years jail and an $11,000 fine. 

Silhouette of woman

New offences in the Crimes Act 1900 criminalise the recording and distributing of intimate images of a person without consent.

As well as the possibility of fines and jail time for perpetrators, courts can order offenders to take reasonable steps to recover, delete or destroy images taken or distributed without consent. Failure to do so could result in an additional two-year jail sentence and a $5500 fine.

It is also an offence to threaten to record or distribute intimate images, providing victims with extra protection against controlling behaviour in abusive relationships.

Special protections apply for children under 16 years of age to ensure the new offences do not inappropriately criminalise activity by, or between, young people.

Attorney General Mark Speakman encouraged victims to report these crimes to police.

“No one should ever use intimate images to threaten, control or humiliate victims, which is why the NSW Government introduced this legislation to ensure perpetrators are held to account,” Mr Speakman said.

“The new laws shift the power away from vengeful ex-partners and manipulative predators and help victims regain privacy and dignity.”

Published 25th August, 2017 in Police & Justice