Sydney Harbour Bridge honours fallen Anzacs

Published 22nd April, 2015 in Arts & Culture

A series of touching images from World War 1 appear on the Sydney Harbour Bridge’s eastern facing North and South pylons, in honour of the fallen Anzacs for the centenary of the Gallipoli landing.

Sydney Harbour Bridge pylon shows image Milson Captain Stewart 4th Battalion Australian Infantry
Image: Milson, Captain Stewart of 4th Australian Infantry Battalion. Son of Arthur James and E. May Milson of Walaya, Milson's Point NSW.

The images will be projected onto the bridge (in 15 minute intervals) from the 22nd – 27th of April between 6:00pm and midnight.

On the 24th April the images will appear all night until 6:00am on Anzac Day.

The images have been selected from the archives of the Australian War Memorial and the State Library of NSW, they tell the Anzac story through a series of six themes, which include:

  • Call to War
  • Commemoration
  • Gallipoli
  • Journey
  • Portraits of ANZACs
  • Support

Each series of projected images features a two minute animation of 'fallen' poppies, falling from the top of the bridge’s pylons. By the end of the week’s projections more than 62,000 poppies will have 'fallen', to represent each of the 62,000 fallen Australian's in World War I.

Following the Anzac story

Four viewing areas located at

  • the Sydney Opera House,
  • Lady Macquarie’s Chair,
  • Dawes Point Park and
  • Bradfield Park, North Sydney

give those people wanting to pay their respects a unique opportunity to be a part of this special commemoration.

The story of each image, the history and the background can be accessed on hand held mobile devices at the Roads and Maritime Service website www.rms.nsw.gov.au/anzac as the images appear on the Sydney Harbour Bridge.

The project is being funded by Roads and Maritime Services and is administered by the NSW Department of Premier and Cabinet. For more information on the Centenary of Anzac go to www.centenaryofanzac.nsw.gov.au 

Published 22nd April, 2015 in Arts & Culture