Check consent, every time.

#MakeNoDoubt

A man and woman smiling and cuddling on a lounge

Consent explained

Sexual consent is free and voluntary

Sexual consent is when people freely and voluntarily agree to engage in sexual activity, including kissing, touching and oral sex.

It’s about making sure everyone is comfortable with what’s happening and freely choosing to say yes.

This means there are situations where people can’t consent (even if they say yes), because they can’t freely choose.

This includes if they’re:

  • heavily affected by drugs or alcohol
  • unconscious or asleep
  • manipulated or threatened into consenting.

Sexual consent is clearly communicated

A person has to say or do something to communicate consent - you can’t assume someone is consenting because they don’t say no.

Sexual consent can be withdrawn

Someone can change their mind and withdraw consent at any time. As soon as a person withdraws consent, the sexual activity must stop.

Sexual consent is ongoing

You always need to check consent, whether it’s the first time you’re hooking up with someone or the hundredth time.

You need to check consent before and during any sexual activity, including kissing, touching and oral sex.

Sexual consent is specific

If someone consents to one thing (like kissing), it doesn’t mean they’ve consented to other things (like touching).

0:15

Make No Doubt - Party (15 seconds)

Read transcript
Video transcript

Make No Doubt - Party (15 seconds)

(Music)

(Kissing noises)

Hey do you want to keep going?

Nah, let's go back to the party.

That's how you do it. Check consent every time. 

 

How to check consent

You always need to check you have sexual consent.

Image

icon showing two speech bubbles, one with a question mark inside it
Ask directly

Asking someone directly is the best way to make sure they feel safe and comfortable.

This can sound scary, but it doesn’t need to be a big deal. Just ask:

“Is this okay?”
“Can I kiss you?”
“Do you want to try ___?”
“Want me to keep going?”
“How does that feel?”
“What do you want to do next?”

Image

Icon showing a document is ticked
Keep checking in

Keep checking in to make sure they’re comfortable. If they change their mind, stop and respect their decision.

Image

Icon showing two love hearts
Check body language

Look at body language and non-verbal cues to make sure they’re comfortable. Just because someone isn’t saying no, doesn’t mean they’re saying yes.

Some signs a person might be uncomfortable are:

  • freezing or not responding to what you’re doing
  • tensing up
  • moving away from you.

If you think someone is showing signs of discomfort or hesitation, stop and ask if they’re okay.

That’s how you do it. Check consent, every time.


Consent and the law

It’s against the law to engage in any kind of sexual activity without sexual consent.

In 2021, NSW passed new laws about sexual consent, which are sometimes called ‘affirmative consent laws.’

Under these new laws:

  • you can’t assume someone is consenting just because they don’t say no – consent must be communicated by words or actions
  • if the other person hasn’t communicated they’re consenting, you have to say or do something to check consent.

You can find out more about sexual consent laws in NSW at Youth Law Australia.

Image

A man and woman lovingly embrace lying on a bed smiling at each other

Easy Read

Read about sexual consent in Easy Read.


Support services

If you or someone you know has been impacted by sexual violence, you’re not alone. To speak with someone who is trained to help, call one of the following support services.

1800RESPECT

A national sexual assault, domestic and family violence counselling service. Available 24/7.

Phone: 1800 737 732
Website: www.1800respect.org

Men’s Referral Service

Call the Men’s Referral Service if you are worried about your own behaviour and looking for support.

Phone: 1300 766 491
Website: ntv.org.au

NSW Sexual Violence Helpline

NSW Sexual Violence Helpline provides support for anyone in NSW impacted by sexual assault (including friends, families and supporters). Available 24/7.

Phone: 1800 424 017
Website: fullstop.org.au


Share our campaign

You can help empower young people to check consent every time by sharing our campaign resources.

Campaign videos

Social tiles

Suggested post

You always need to check you have consent.

Asking directly is the best way to make sure everyone feels safe and comfortable.

So, just ask:

  • “Is this okay?”
  • “Can I kiss you?”
  • “Do you want to try ___?”
  • “Want me to keep going?”
  • “How does that feel?”

That’s how you do it. Check consent, every time. #makenodoubt

Find out more: nsw.gov.au/makenodoubt

Material on this webpage is subject to third party copyright limitations. While sharing on social media channels is permitted, other uses require permission. Enquiries regarding third party use should be forwarded to sexualviolence@facs.nsw.gov.au.

Top of page