Skip to main content

State flag

The NSW state flag has been in use since 1876. It includes the Union Jack and the NSW badge. The flag is flown on special occasions and at half-mast as a sign of remembrance.

National Police Remembrance Day

Each year, 29 September holds a special significance for Police throughout Australia, New Zealand, Papua New Guinea, Samoa and the Solomon Islands. It is a day for police to pause to honour officers whose lives have been cut short while performing their duty as a police officer. This important day is also a time to remember police officers who have lost their lives through illness or other circumstances.

As a mark of respect, the Australian National Flag and the New South Wales State Flag should be flown at half-mast all day on Tuesday 29 September 2020 from all buildings and establishments occupied by Government departments and affiliated agencies. Departments are requested to advise all agencies within their portfolios of these arrangements. Other organisations are welcome to participate.

 

NSW state flag

Protocol

A flag is an emblem which stands for its people, history and ideals. NSW has its own distinctive flag. As the premier symbol of NSW since 1876, the NSW flag represents all the people of the state.

The NSW Government supports the flying of both the NSW and national flags, and encourages everyone to become familiar with the protocols for the correct use of these flags.

The Flag and Emblems of New South Wales booklet not only details the history of the NSW flag and coat of arms but outlines the general procedures to be followed in flying the NSW state flag.

Special occasions for flying flags

Date Occasion
1 January Anniversary of the establishment of the Commonwealth of Australia
26 January Australia Day
13 February Apology to members of the Stolen Generation
March, second Monday Commonwealth Day
25 April ANZAC Day – Flags flown at half-mast until noon then full-mast for the remainder of the day.
26 May National Sorry Day – The Australian Aboriginal Flag and the Torres Strait Islander Flag should be flown on additional flagpoles, where available, next to or near the Australian National Flag.
27 May – 3 June National Reconciliation Week – The Australian Aboriginal Flag and the Torres Strait Islander Flag should be flown on additional flagpoles, where available, next to or near the Australian National Flag.
June, second Monday The Queen’s Birthday
6 – 13 July NAIDOC Week
3 September Australian National Flag Day
17 September Citizenship Day
29 September New South Wales Police Remembrance Day
12 October New South Wales Terrorism and Homicide Victims Remembrance Day
24 October United Nations Day
11 November Remembrance Day – Flags are flown at full-mast from 8:00am to 10:30am. Lower to half-mast until 11:02am and then raise to full-mast for the remainder of the day.

Note: Flags are also flown on special occasions and at half-mast for State Funerals, State Memorials and funerals of Heads of State of other countries.

Subscribe to the NSW Flag Network

Are you unsure of the flag protocols around a particular day or look to seek advice on what days to fly the NSW flag?

All NSW flag marshals now have the opportunity to register for the NSW Flag Network.

By joining the network, you will be the first to be notified via email with the latest flag protocol for special occasions such as ANZAC Day, or on occasions when flags should be half-mast.

For further information about flying the flags, email Protocol New South Wales at the NSW Department of Premier and Cabinet.

Top of page